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    John Harris Jr.

    John Harris Jr. (17 November 1791 – 28 December 1873) was a renowned English artist specializing in pen-and-ink facsimile work and Masonic catechetical designs. Following in the footsteps of his father, John Harris Sr., a notable watercolour painter, Harris Jr., also known as John Harris the Younger, carved his own path in the art world.

    Harris's expertise lay in creating meticulous facsimiles used to replace damaged or decayed pages in books, a process that gained popularity through his employer, John Whittaker, and the patronage of George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer. His work was not merely functional; it was an art form in its own right, seamlessly blending with original pages to the point where even seasoned experts struggled to discern the difference.

    During his tenure at the British Museum from 1820 onwards, Harris undertook extensive restoration projects for the national collection. His facsimile work was so impeccable that it often left scholars baffled, necessitating Harris's own guidance to identify his contributions.

    One of Harris's notable clients was Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, the Grand Master of English Freemasonry, who praised Harris's services in restoring his library. Such was the acclaim for Harris's work that the Trustees of the British Museum implemented a regulation requiring all facsimile pages in restored books to bear a distinguishing mark, a testament to Harris's unparalleled skill and dedication to his craft.

    John Harris Jr.'s legacy endures through his contributions to the preservation and enhancement of literary treasures, leaving an indelible mark on the realms of art, restoration, and scholarly inquiry.

    John Harris Jr.

    John Harris Jr. (17 November 1791 – 28 December 1873) was a renowned English artist specializing in pen-and-ink facsimile work and Masonic catechetical designs. Following in the footsteps of his father, John Harris Sr., a notable watercolour painter, Harris Jr., also known as John Harris the Younger, carved his own path in the art world.

    Harris's expertise lay in creating meticulous facsimiles used to replace damaged or decayed pages in books, a process that gained popularity through his employer, John Whittaker, and the patronage of George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer. His work was not merely functional; it was an art form in its own right, seamlessly blending with original pages to the point where even seasoned experts struggled to discern the difference.

    During his tenure at the British Museum from 1820 onwards, Harris undertook extensive restoration projects for the national collection. His facsimile work was so impeccable that it often left scholars baffled, necessitating Harris's own guidance to identify his contributions.

    One of Harris's notable clients was Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, the Grand Master of English Freemasonry, who praised Harris's services in restoring his library. Such was the acclaim for Harris's work that the Trustees of the British Museum implemented a regulation requiring all facsimile pages in restored books to bear a distinguishing mark, a testament to Harris's unparalleled skill and dedication to his craft.

    John Harris Jr.'s legacy endures through his contributions to the preservation and enhancement of literary treasures, leaving an indelible mark on the realms of art, restoration, and scholarly inquiry.

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